Smoke versus Vapor

The Tobacco Industry vs the Electronic Cigarette


Tobacco Products

Government Complacency

Governments around the world have long been aware of the associated health risks caused by tobacco products, unfortunately for those of us that still smoke, the tobacco industry is one of the most lucrative ... reaping trillions of dollars annually, therefore they have and will continue to remain available to the consumer. Here are some numbers for you to digest ... China is home to 300 million smokers who consume approximately 1.7 trillion cigarettes a year, that's 3 million cigarettes a minute. Worldwide, there are approximately 10 million cigarettes purchased a minute, 15 billion are sold each day and upwards of 5 trillion are produced and used on an annual basis. It is a fact that the use of tobacco is the single largest cause of preventable deaths worldwide and accounts for more than 440,000 of the more than 2.4 million annual deaths, but yet our Governments and the FDA still "approve" this deadly product.

These figures are staggering.


One tobacco product and the dangers associated with it, that is often overlooked is chewing tobacco. Amazingly enough, chewing tobacco is a product that  is quite often touted as being the "Safest" tobacco product, by many Health Officials and Tobacco activists. As you will see in the following short video, you don't even have to "smoke" tobacco for it to maim and kill you. Please keep in mind that this is a product which again, is approved by our Governments and the FDA. If this is the "Safest" Tobacco product on the market and it is capable of doing this to a persons body ... stop for a minute and think about what the tobacco cigarettes are doing to you.


To understand more about the effects of moist snuff, please refer to this communication by the University Cancer Center, Minneapolis. There was a significant and alarming increase in snuff products in the USA. Snuff dipping in North America is an accepted cause of oral cancer.

Smokeless Tobacco*

Known to be a human carcinogen
First Listed in the Ninth Report on Carcinogens (2000)

Carcinogenicity
The oral use of smokeless tobacco is known to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in humans that indicate a causal relationship between exposure to smokeless tobacco and human cancer. Smokeless tobacco has been determined to cause cancers of the oral cavity (IARC 1985, 1987, Gross et al. 1995). Cancers of the oral cavity have been associated with the use of chewing tobacco as well as snuff, which are the two main forms of smokeless tobacco used in the United States. Tumors often arise at the site of placement of the tobacco.

Continued

Cigarettes

As smokers, we don't think about the chemicals in cigarettes. We think about how cigarettes help us cope with the stress of daily life, how they calm us down when we're angry, help us relax at the end of a long day, comfort us when we're sad or lonely. Harmful chemicals in cigarettes? No, we don't think much about that.

The truth of the matter is that smoking does the opposite of just about everything we give it credit for. When the chemicals in cigarettes are inhaled, they put our bodies into a state of physical stress by sending literally thousands of poisons, toxic metals and carcinogens coursing through our bloodstream with every puff we take. And those chemicals affect everything from blood pressure and pulse rate to the health of our organs and immune system.

While researchers are still working to uncover all of the hazards cigarettes present to human life, we do know that air tainted with cigarette smoke is dangerous for anyone who breathes it -- smoker or not. The end and final result is that if you smoke ... it will kill you. It is all just a matter of time and fate, with regards to which of the many tobacco related diseases will be the one to kill you.

An Experiment - Toxins From An Electronic Cigarette "Banned" vs A Real Cigarette - FDA "Approved"

September 17, 2009

I ran across this video made by a smoking, turned vapor, consumer type citizen and was impressed with his efforts and wanted to share his video with you. Although not as scientific as some may like ... it does however show the very distinct difference between "Smoke and Vapor". 


Let's take a closer look at some of the harmful chemicals in cigarettes and how they affect our health.

Chemicals in Cigarettes: Carcinogens

A carcinogen is defined as any substance that can cause or aggravate cancer. Approximately 60 of the chemicals in cigarettes are known to cause cancer.

TSNAs
Tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNAs) are known to be some of the most potent carcinogens present in smokeless tobacco, snuff and tobacco smoke.

Benzene
Benzene can be found in pesticides and gasoline. It is present in high levels in cigarette smoke and accounts for half of all human exposure to this hazardous chemical.

Pesticides
Pesticides are used on our lawns and gardens, and inhaled into our lungs via cigarette smoke.

Formaldehyde
Formaldehyde is a chemical used to preserve dead bodies, and is responsible for some of the nose, throat and eye irritation smokers experience when breathing in cigarette smoke.


Toxic Metals

Toxic / heavy metals are metals and metal compounds that have the potential to harm our health when absorbed or inhaled. In very small amounts, some of these metals support life, but when taken in large amounts, can become toxic.

Arsenic
Commonly used in rat poison, arsenic finds its way into cigarette smoke through some of the pesticides that are used in tobacco farming.

Cadmium
Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal that is used in batteries. Smokers typically have twice as much cadmium in their bodies as nonsmokers.


Poisons

Poison is defined as any substance that, when introduced to a living organism, causes severe physical distress or death. Science has discovered approximately 200 poisonous gases in cigarette smoke.

Ammonia
Ammonia compounds are commonly used in cleaning products and fertilizers. Ammonia is also used to boost the impact of nicotine in manufactured cigarettes.

Carbon Monoxide
Carbon monoxide is present in car exhaust and is lethal in very large amounts. Cigarette smoke can contain high levels of carbon monoxide.

Hydrogen Cyanide
Hydrogen cyanide was used to kill people in the gas chambers in Nazi Germany during World War II. It can be found in cigarette smoke.



A bit of Levity for you all, but it does have it's merit points though.


The following table, sourced from US Surgeon General Reports on the Health Consequences of smoking summarize the toxic components of cigarettes.

Primary Toxic and Carcinogenic components of Cigarette Smoke including vapor-phase and particulate phase components


Agent
Toxic       
 
Ciliotoxic

Carcinogenic
Co-carcinogenic
/ Promoter
Carbon Monoxide x


Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) x


Hydrogen Cyanide x x

Formaldehyde
x x
Acrolein
x

Acetaldehyde
x

Ammonia x


Hydrazine

x
Vinyl Chloride

x
Urethane

x
2-Nitropropane

x
Quinoline

x
Benzo[a]pyrene

x x
Dibenz[a,h]anthracene

x x
Benzo[b]fluoranthene

x x
Benzo[j]fluoranthene

x x
Dibenzo[a,h]pyrene

x x
Dibenzo[a,i]pyrene

x x
Dibenz[a,j]acridine

x x
Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene

x x
Benzo[c]phenanthrene

x x
Benz[a]anthracene

x x
Benzo[e]pyrene

x x
Chrysene

x x
Methylchrysene

x x
Mehtylfluoranthene

x x
Dibenz[a,c]anthracene

x x
Dibenz[a,h]acridine

x x
Dibenzo[c,g]carbazole

x x
Mehtylnaphtalenes


x
1-Methylindoles


x
Dichlorostilbene


x
Catechol


x
3-Methycatechol


x
4-Methycatechol


x
4-Ethycatechol


x
4-n-Propylcatechol


x
Nitrosodimethylamine

x
Nitrosoethymethylamine

x
Nitrosodiethylamine

x
Nitrosodi-n-propylamine

x
Nitrosodi-n-butylamine

x
Nitrosopyrrolidine

x
Nitrosopiperidine

x
Nitrosomorpholine

x
N'-Nitrosonornicotine

x
4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone

x
N'-Nitrosoanabasine

x
N'-Nitrosoanatabine

x
Aromatic Amines

x
Aromatic Nitrohydrocarbons

x
Polonium-210

x
Nickel

x
Arsenic

x
Cadmium

x


A Word About Secondhand Smoke

Also known as environmental tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke is a term used to describe cigarette smoke that comes from two sources: Smoke that is exhaled by the smoker (mainstream smoke) and smoke produced by a smouldering cigarette (sidestream smoke). Secondhand smoke is known to contain at least 250 toxic chemicals, including 50 cancer-causing chemicals. According to the U.S. Surgeon General, there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. That means if you can smell cigarette smoke in the air, it could be harming your health.

The Health Risks Associated With Tobacco Use

By Terry Martin, About.com Guide to Smoking Cessation

Statistics tell us that tobacco steals approximately seven precious lives every minute of every day of the year, world-wide. From heart disease and many forms of cancer to lung diseases that steal our ability to breathe, tobacco is a vicious killer in sheep's clothing. An important step in the recovery process from nicotine addiction is to look closely at the damage smoking causes. As hard as that can be, it will help fuel your resolve to quit smoking, once and for all.

Cigarette Ingredients

The ingredients and additives in cigarettes when burned, create toxic, harmful chemical compounds. Those chemicals, which number 4000 or more, contain poisons and carcinogens that damage our bodies when inhaled directly or indirectly through secondhand smoke. Scientists have yet to identify all of the chemicals present in cigarette smoke, but the body of knowledge on the deadly effects of smoking continues to expand.

Smoking-Related Disease

Cigarette smoking is a loaded gun that can go off without warning. It is most often a slow killer, wearing us down over many years of habit, but not always. It has been known to steal the young and novice smoker as well. Inhaled cigarette smoke leaves toxic deposits in our lungs and other organs, impairing function and poisoning our health. And smokeless tobacco products have been linked to many forms of cancer. Learn about how smoking negatively affects your body and use that information to bolster your resolve to quit.

Teen Smoking

Worldwide, most people start smoking before the age of 18, with nearly one quarter of them trying tobacco for the first time before the age of 10. And, the younger a child is when he or she starts smoking, the stronger the odds are for long-term addiction. Educating our kids about the dangers of tobacco use needs to start at home. Talk to your kids early and often about smoking, and help them develop a healthy hatred for the habit.

Our Stories

Smoking-related disease is snatching our beloved family members and friends away from us at an alarming rate. According to the World Health Organization, smoking related-diseases kill one in 10 adults globally, causing four million deaths a year. While some of the accounts in this section are heartbreaking and difficult to read, they are stark reminders of what may well lie ahead of us if we don't stop smoking. My heartfelt thanks go out to all who have shared their very personal and often painful stories here with us in the effort to help save lives...your life, dear reader.